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Fraser Health Patient Education Materials

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  • Urinary Catheter: Care at Home (Child) [English] Public

    Your child has come home from the hospital with a urinary catheter. A catheter is a thin tube. A urinary catheter drains urine (pee) from your child's bladder to the outside of the body. There are some things you need to do to look after your child's catheter at home. Parents and older children can learn how to care for a catheter. Before your child goes home, a nurse will show you what to do. This page also explains what to do. There are different types of urinary catheters: A Foley catheter enters your child's bladder through the tube that carries urine out of the body (the urethra). A suprapubic catheter enters your child's bladder through a cut in the belly. You care for both these catheters the same way. Audio available. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/TestsAnd...

  • Mitrofanoff: Catheterization and Care (Child) [English] Public

    A Mitrofanoff​ (say: me-TROFF-an-off) is a small tunnel from the bladder to the outside of the body. This tunnel is made with surgery (an operation). The opening on the outside of the body is called a stoma. Right after the operation, your child will have a tube that drains urine (pee) from the bladder. This is called a suprapubic catheter. A catheter is a thin, soft tube. Later, you and your child need to learn how to use a different kind of catheter. This catheter drains urine through the Mitrofanoff. You will put it in every time your child's bladder needs to be emptied. A nurse will teach you and your child how to catheterize the Mitrofanoff. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/TestsAnd...

  • Restricting Fluids (Child) [English] Public

    Sometimes, children with kidney problems need to limit how much fluid they drink. Healthy kidneys clean the blood and flush out unwanted fluid and chemicals through urine. Kidneys that are not working properly cannot do this. Instead, extra fluid stays in the body and builds up. If too much fluid builds up in the body it can cause the following problems: puffiness and weight gain high blood pressure trouble breathing This information will help you prepare your child for his test or treatment. It describes what sedation is, what happens when your child gets sedation, and how to care for your child after the test or treatment. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/TestsAnd...

  • Urinary Tract Infection (Child) [English] Public

    You have an infection in your bladder. A bladder infection is also called a urinary tract infection (or UTI). This infection is most often caused by bacteria travelling up the urethra into the bladder. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/Conditio...

  • Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC): Step By Step Instructions for Boys [English] Public

    CIC is a technique that your child will have to do several times a day to help empty urine (pee) from his bladder. CIC stands for Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Clean: as germ-free as possible Intermittent: done on a regular schedule many times a day Catheterization: using a catheter, a kind of thin tube, to drain urine out of the bladder. CIC is necessary when your child is unable to empty his bladder on his own, when his bladder leaks urine, or when very high pressure has developed in the bladder. If the bladder is not properly emptied, infections or other problems can happen. CIC is not hard to do. Your child cannot hurt his bladder if he follows the nurse’s directions. With a little practice, almost everyone can learn the technique, even a 5-year-old child. Audio available. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/TestsAnd...

  • Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC): Step By Step Instructions for Girls [English] Public

    CIC is a technique that your child will have to do several times a day to help empty urine (pee) from her bladder. CIC stands for Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Clean: as germ-free as possible Intermittent: done on a regular schedule many times a day Catheterization: using a catheter, a kind of thin tube, to drain urine out of the bladder CIC is necessary when your child is unable to empty her bladder on her own, when her bladder leaks urine, or when very high pressure has developed in the bladder. If the bladder is not properly emptied, infections or other problems can happen. CIC is not hard to do. Your child cannot hurt her bladder if she follows the nurse’s directions. With a little practice, almost everyone can learn the technique, even a 5-year-old child. Audio available. (English)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/TestsAnd...

  • Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC): Step By Step Instructions for Boys [Chinese] Public

    CIC is a technique that your child will have to do several times a day to help empty urine (pee) from his bladder. CIC stands for Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Clean: as germ-free as possible Intermittent: done on a regular schedule many times a day Catheterization: using a catheter, a kind of thin tube, to drain urine out of the bladder. CIC is necessary when your child is unable to empty his bladder on his own, when his bladder leaks urine, or when very high pressure has developed in the bladder. If the bladder is not properly emptied, infections or other problems can happen. CIC is not hard to do. Your child cannot hurt his bladder if he follows the nurse’s directions. With a little practice, almost everyone can learn the technique, even a 5-year-old child. Audio available. (Chinese)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/Multilin...

  • Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC): Step By Step Instructions for Girls [Chinese] Public

    CIC is a technique that your child will have to do several times a day to help empty urine (pee) from her bladder. CIC stands for Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Clean: as germ-free as possible Intermittent: done on a regular schedule many times a day Catheterization: using a catheter, a kind of thin tube, to drain urine out of the bladder CIC is necessary when your child is unable to empty her bladder on her own, when her bladder leaks urine, or when very high pressure has developed in the bladder. If the bladder is not properly emptied, infections or other problems can happen. CIC is not hard to do. Your child cannot hurt her bladder if she follows the nurse’s directions. With a little practice, almost everyone can learn the technique, even a 5-year-old child. Audio available. (Chinese)

    URL:
    http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/Multilin...

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